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Friday, November 19, 2021
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How Many Republicans Are Pro Choice

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Republican Majority For Choice

Pro-Choice Republican Group? Alternative Conservatives

The Republican Majority for Choice was a Republican organization in the United States dedicated to preserving legal access to abortion. The group also supported federal funding for all kinds of stem cell research, including embryonic stem cell research.

RMC had a political action committee and supported Republicans across the country who favored abortion rights. The group closed operations in 2018.

The name was chosen to emphasize information based on polling that consistently shows that a majority of Republicans support legal access to abortion in at least some circumstances. In 2009, Gallup reported that 66% of Republicans agreed that abortion should be legal in some or all circumstances. A Gallup poll in 2011 found that 27% of Republicans identified themselves as “pro-choice”. However, 42% of Republicans support legal abortion during the first trimester. In 2017, Gallup released polling information showing that 36% of Republicans identified as “pro-choice” and 70% agreed that abortion should be legal in some or all circumstances.

In 2018, an NBC/Wall St Journal poll found that 52% of Republicans supported the Roe v Wade Supreme Court ruling and did not want said ruling to be overturned.


More Than Half Of Americans Identify As Pro

More than half of Americans now identify as pro-choice when it comes to abortion, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll released Friday.

The poll found that 57 percent of Americans surveyed said they support abortion rights, while 35 percent;said they were against the procedure. A similar poll in January found that;55 percent of Americans considered themselves pro-choice, while 38;percent identified as pro-life.;

Support for legal abortions was highest among Democrats, with 74 percent of;respondents saying they supported abortion rights, while 64 percent of Republicans said they were against it. Sixty percent of independents said they identified as pro-choice.

The gap between;men and women on the issue was slim, the poll found, with 54 percent of men saying they support abortion,;compared with;60 percent of women who said the same.

The issue remains a hot-button topic ahead of the 2020 election cycle.;More than half 53;percent of respondents said they would definitely not vote for a presidential candidate who would put justices on the Supreme Court;who would limit or overturn Roe V. Wade, the landmark ruling that legalized abortion.


More than three-quarters of those surveyed, 77;percent, said the Supreme Court should uphold the landmark decision that established a womans right to abortion in some form. A;strong majority, 61 percent, said they favored a combination of limitations on abortion.

Who Led The Shift

Leading the way were Democrats and those under 45 years of age who now say theyre pro-life, the organization said. The dramatic shift occurred in the wake of several states efforts to legalize abortion up until birth, the Knights of Columbus added.

More from the organization:

Among Democrats, the gap between pro-life and pro-choice identifiers was cut in half from 55 percent to 27 percent. The number of Democrats now identifying as pro-life is 34 percent, up from 20 percent last month, while the number identifying as pro-choice fell from 75 percent to 61 percent. Younger Americans also moved dramatically, now dividing 47 percent pro-life to 48 percent pro-choice. One month ago, the gap was almost 40 percentage points with only 28 percent identifying as pro-life and 65 percent identifying as pro-choice.

The recent legal changes to late-term abortion and the debate which followed have not gone unnoticed by the general public, Barbara Carvalho, director of the Marist Poll, told the Knights of Columbus. In just one month, there has been a significant increase in the proportion of Americans who see themselves as pro-life and an equally notable decline in those who describe themselves as pro-choice.

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From 201: Majority Of Americans Dont Want Roe V Wade Overturned

Politically, abortion has been a stronger voting issue for Republicans than for Democrats. This poll found that abortion ranks as the second-most-important issue for Republicans in deciding their vote for president, behind immigration. But for Democrats, it is fifth behind health care, Americas role in the world, climate change and personal financial well-being.

The poll also notably found the highest percentage of people self-identifying as pro-choice, those who generally support abortion rights, since a Gallup survey in December 2012. In this survey, 57% identified that way versus 35%, who called themselves pro-life, those who are generally opposed to abortion rights.

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The percentage self-identifying as pro-choice is an increase since a Marist Poll in February, when the two sides split with 47% each. The pollsters attribute that shift to efforts in various states to severely restrict abortion.

The public is very reactive to the arguments being put forth by the more committed advocates on both sides of the issue, Carvalho said, adding, The danger for Republicans is that when you look at independents, independents are moving more toward Democrats on this issue. When the debate starts overstepping what public opinion believes to be common sense, weve seen independents moving in Democrats corner.


Majority Of Republican Voters Support Roe V Wade As Gop Continues Crackdown On Abortion Rights

Pro

A majority of Republican voters do not support overturning the nation’s landmark Supreme Court ruling legalizing abortionbut there is little sign of that from those representing the GOP, either in Congress or the White House.

A poll released byNBC News and the Wall Street Journal Tuesday indicated that support for Roe v. Wade, which gave women the right to legal abortions, is at an all-time high amid growing concern that President Donald Trump’s conservative Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh may decisively affect the 1973 decision.

The survey indicated that 71 percent of American voters back the high court decision. Predictably, nearly 90 percent of Democrats polled believed that the decision should be upheld. That demographic was followed by independent voters, 76 percent of whom said Roe v. Wade should remain.

More surprising was that Republican support of the ruling was in the majority, with 52 percent of GOP voters responding that they wanted the ruling to remain intact. Only around four in every 10 Republicans said that the decision should be changed.

“I think that Republicans have rethought about their loyalty to the party,” Milloy told Newsweek on Tuesday. Milloy said that the poll is “reflective of how the party is hopefully kind of shifting demographically despite the current Trump administration.”


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Trump Administration Restricts Federal Research Involving Human Fetal Tissue

On requiring insurance companies to cover abortion procedures, 75% of Democratic women support that, while 78% of Republican women oppose it, higher than the 63% of Republican men who said the same.

Republican women also stand out for the 62% of them who said they oppose laws that allow abortion at any time during pregnancy in cases of rape or incest. They are the only group to voice majority opposition to that. Fifty-nine percent of Republican men, for example, said they would support such a law.

And Republican women are the only group to say overwhelmingly that life begins at conception. About three-quarters said so, compared with less than half of Republican men and a third of Democratic women.

It’s a reminder that Republican women, in many ways, are the backbone of the movement opposing abortion rights.


The survey of 944 adults was conducted by live interviewers by telephone from May 31 through June 4. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.

Editor’s note: The survey asked respondents to identify as either “pro-life” or “pro-choice.” This question wording, using the labels “pro-life” and “pro-choice,” was included in the survey because it has tracked the public debate on abortion over decades. It is sensitive to current events and public discussion even though it does not capture the nuanced positions many people have on the issue.

What Data Says About Americans Support Of Abortion Rights

Various polls and studies have asked Americans how they feel about abortion since the mid-1970s. Typically, these polls ask participants whether they identify as pro-life or pro-choice as well as whether they think abortion should be legal in all cases, in some/certain cases, or not at all. For this project, we honed in specifically on the legality question because, while a person can call themselves pro-life or pro-choice , that identification doesnt always match up with what a person thinks should be law.

That being said, there is some nuance to be considered when using legality to judge how people view abortion, says Andrea Miller, president of the National Institute for Reproductive Health . How many of us walk around in the world, thinking about, you know, the state of legality of most things? she asks. People think about in the context of their lives and the context of the people they know. There is also a lot of variation in where people fall in the legal in most/some cases category. For example, while someone might not think abortion should be illegal outright, they might feel that there should be restrictions on who can provide abortions or where and when they can be performed. That technically puts them in the same category as someone who is generally supportive of abortion being legal but may be uncomfortable with the idea of someone getting an abortion in the third trimester.

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Abortion Has Never Been Just About Abortion

Mr. Edsall contributes a weekly column from Washington, D.C., on politics, demographics and inequality.

As recently as 1984, abortion was not a deeply partisan issue.

The difference in support for the pro-choice position was a mere six percentage points, Alan Abramowitz, a political scientist at Emory University, told me by email. 40 percent of Democratic identifiers were pro-life, while 39 percent were pro-choice. Among Republican identifiers, 33 percent were pro-choice, 45 percent were pro-life and 22 percent were in the middle.

73 percent of Democratic identifiers took the pro-choice position, while only 17 percent took the pro-life position, with 10 percent in the middle. Among Republicans, 60 percent took the pro-life position while 25 percent took the pro-choice position and 15 percent were in the middle. The difference in support for the pro-choice position was 48 percentage points.

This split was even wider, 59 points, among strong partisans, the group most likely to vote in primary elections, Abramowitz said.

Crucially, Abramowitz pointed out, opinions on abortion are also closely connected with racial attitudes:


The anti-abortion movement has been remarkably successful at convincing observers that the positions individuals take on the abortion issue always follow in a deductive way from their supposed moral principles. They dont, Katherine Stewart, the author of the 2019 book The Power Worshipers, wrote in an email.

It wasnt always this way.

From 201: Majority Of Americans Don’t Want Roe V Wade Overturned

How Will GOP React to Pro-Choice or Gay Judge?!

Politically, abortion has been a stronger voting issue for Republicans than for Democrats. This poll found that abortion ranks as the second-most-important issue for Republicans in deciding their vote for president, behind immigration. But for Democrats, it is fifth behind health care, America’s role in the world, climate change and personal financial well-being.

The poll also notably found the highest percentage of people self-identifying as “pro-choice,” those who generally support abortion rights, since a Gallup survey in December 2012. In this survey, 57% identified that way versus 35%, who called themselves “pro-life,” those who are generally opposed to abortion rights.

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The percentage self-identifying as “pro-choice” is an increase since a Marist Poll in February, when the two sides split with 47% each. The pollsters attribute that shift to efforts in various states to severely restrict abortion.

“The public is very reactive to the arguments being put forth by the more committed advocates on both sides of the issue,” Carvalho said, adding, “The danger for Republicans is that when you look at independents, independents are moving more toward Democrats on this issue. … When the debate starts overstepping what public opinion believes to be common sense, we’ve seen independents moving in Democrats’ corner.”

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The Role Of The Supreme Court

President Donald Trumps two appointments to the Supreme Court, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, gave Republican-appointed justices a majority on the nations highest court.

Anti-abortion advocates see the courts makeup as a chance to weaken or overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 court ruling that legalized abortion.

They want to make hay while the sun shines and pass as much of their pet legislation as they can while they have the opportunity, said Dennis Goldford, a political science professor at Drake University in Des Moines.

Some state lawmakers and activists have said theyve specifically written legislation to spark a legal challenge that will end up before the Supreme Court.

Anti-abortion marchers rally at the Supreme Court during the 46th annual March for Life in Washington, on January 18, 2019. Some state lawmakers have said the bills they are pushing aim to ultimately overturn Roe v. Wade. Photo by Joshua Roberts/Reuters

The current focus on overturning Roe v. Wade has parallels to the early 1990s, when the court had eight justices who were appointed by Republican presidents. In 1992, the court reaffirmed Roe v. Wade in the case Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which questioned a Pennsylvania law that implemented a number of restrictions on abortions. The court upheld most of the provisions but also established that state rules cannot impose an undue burden on a woman seeking an abortion before the fetus attains viability.

Both Sides Still Tried To Appeal To The Center For A While

Even after the parties began to move apart on the issue, activists on both sides tried to appeal to the center, as Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University who studies the history of the abortion debate, wrote recently at the Washington Post. In the 1990s and early 2000s, for instance, many abortion opponents devoted their energy to supporting incremental restrictions, like a ban on dilation and extraction, a technique for abortions later in pregnancy that opponents called partial-birth abortion. The restriction, which was eventually passed at the federal level in 2003, is far less sweeping than the heartbeat bills many Republican lawmakers favor today, which would ban abortions as early as six weeks.

Democrats, meanwhile, could be somewhat equivocal on abortion during this time period, with Bill Clinton during his 1992 campaign famously saying that abortions should be safe, legal, and rare. Hillary Clinton used the same language in her 2008 presidential campaign.

But more recently, both sides of the abortion debate have come to seek broader change. Among abortion-rights supporters, theres been an increasing awareness of reproductive justice.The term, coined in 1994, describes an approach focused not just on the legal right to an abortion, but on safe, affordable access to a range of reproductive health care, as well as the ability to parent children safely.

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Planned Parenthood Case Summary

to defund Planned Parenthood and multiple states passing restrictive laws, reproductive rightsand abortion in particularcontinue to be increasingly under attack in the United States. In 1973, the Supreme Court ruled in Roe v. Wade that a womans choice whether to have an abortion is protected by her right to privacy and that any restrictions on that right must be under strict scrutiny. This means that by law, women have the right to get abortions without facing unnecessary restrictions. According

Texas Law Could Flip Script On Abortion Politics With Democrats Eyeing Gains

Charlotte Maloney: Republicans are pro

WASHINGTON Virginia was once at the forefront of anti-abortion efforts, going to the Supreme Court to defend its right to prosecute a newspaper publisher for running an ad promoting abortion.

But today, Democrats are betting that voters in the modern-day Old Dominion will keep them in the governor’s office to defend abortion rights after the Supreme Court tipped its hand on the hot-button issue Wednesday.

From Virginia to California, Democrats are trying to motivate voters as the expanded conservative majority on the court inches closer to limiting or overturning the right to terminate a pregnancy for the first time in nearly half a century. It is a glimpse into Americas shifting politics on abortion, which have typically energized conservatives more.

Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat and the former governor of Virginia who is running for a second term, was already airing TV ads about abortion before the court allowed Texas strict new law, which bans abortion after six weeks, to go into effect Wednesday.

And now, he says the imminent threat to Roe v. Wade will help motivate Democrats to show up in November and return him to office to ensure that abortions remain legal.

People have been talking about the end of abortion for years and years. Now it’s actually happening, McAuliffe said. That will get people to come out in droves. It will really motivate folks.

Now, that safe space is gone.

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Abortion Trends By Party Identification

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The following graphs display Gallup’s full trends on U.S. views about abortion by party identification.

  • The first set of graphs provide views since 1975 about the legality of abortion.
  • The second set of graphs display self-identification since 1995 as “pro-choice” vs. “pro-life” on the abortion issue.

Mellman: The Rise Of The Pro

Cold War babies like me were taught to abhor communism as children.

My earliest memory of such instruction came from a teacher who raged against what she claimed was communisms demand that people inform on family, friends and neighbors, turning them over to the secret police for actions or views critical of the regime.;;

I shudder to think what those now deceased teachers would say about Republicans in Texas, and elsewhere, encouraging citizens to intervene in their neighbors most intimate decisions by suing them for giving a friend a ride to an abortion clinic or being a woman who received one.

Joe BidenSocial media making political polarization worse: reportBiden and UKs Johnson to meet for talks this month: reportToyota, Honda knock union-made EV incentive in Dems spending packageMORE called it vigilantism. In my youth, it wouldve seemed a form of creeping totalitarianism.;

This disastrous policy, designed to outlaw abortion while enabling recent Republican Supreme Court justices to parry well-founded accusations of perjury in their confirmation hearings, is a dagger pointed at the political heart of the GOP.

Though it was never counted as one of the most important problems facing the country , abortion played a lead role as culture developed into our central line of political cleavage.;

In recent years, two facts emerged clearly: First, the vast majority of Americans are what the political class would call pro-choice .

Public opinion is clear.;;

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