Monday, December 5, 2022

How Do Republicans Feel About Abortion

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President Richard Nixon On Abortion

Cecile Richards: Extraordinary Victory For Abortion Rights In Kansas

As the president in office at the time of the ruling for Roe v. Wade, it would be expected for Richard Nixon to have a good deal to say on the abortion issue. However, at the time that the ruling was made, Nixon declined to comment publicly about it. He later stated that There are times when an abortion is necessary, I know that, stating that he considered abortion in the case of rape to be one of these times. However, he believed that greater access to abortion would create an air of permissiveness about the procedure, which was not acceptable.

Former Illinois Representative Joe Walsh Said You Don’t Need To Add Exceptions In Anti

Walsh later released a statement saying that he did support abortion in cases when both the mother and child would die otherwise, calling it a “rare” scenario. “While, I do not support abortion, I do of course support medical procedures for women during their pregnancies that might result in the loss of the unborn child. When such an occurrence takes place, that decision on whether to perform that procedure is a very difficult one and one that should be left up to the mother and her family.”

Republican Leaders Asked The Supreme Court To End Legal Abortion They May Get Their Wish

Finally, Republicans are saying what they have always meant about abortion: They want to make it illegal for everyone all the time, full stop.

On Thursday, more than 200 Republican members of Congress filed by the anti-abortion organization Americans United for Life, asking the Supreme Court to reconsider and potentially overturn the landmark abortion rights rulings in Planned Parenthood v. Casey and Roe v. Wade. That represents fully 80 percent of congressional Republicans, and included 39 Republican senators and the three top House Republicans.


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Mitt Romney On Abortion

Romney is a Republican whose views on abortion include exceptions. While he has in the past defended a womans right to choose, he stated in his 2002 campaign for governor that he believes abortion is the wrong choice except in cases of incest, rape, and to save the life of the mother. Romney also stands apart from the bulk of his party on the issue of a federal ban on abortion, and rather believing the issue should be left to the states. Romney stated in an interview to the Boston Globe in 2005 while the nation remains so divided over abortion, I believe that the states, through the democratic process, should determine their own abortion laws and not have them dictated by judicial mandate.

With Roe On The Line Both Sides Are Aiming High

Charlotte Maloney: Republicans are pro

In the midst of these drives for greater public acceptance of abortion, Donald Trump became president. Trump promised during his campaign to appoint Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade, and he appears to have made good on that promise Justices Neal Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh are seen by advocates on both sides of the issue as potential votes to gut the landmark abortion decision.

After Trumps inauguration, Republican state legislators began passing increasingly restrictive abortion laws, banning abortion after 15 weeks or even earlier. In many cases, the architects of these laws believed such restrictionswould stand a better chance in court than in years past, thanks to a federal bench populated with Trump appointees, both at the Supreme Court and at lower levels. Mississippi, Kentucky, and Georgia lawmakers, for example, have all passed heartbeat bills that would ban abortions as early as six weeks, before many women even know theyre pregnant.

The increasingly restrictive laws on the anti-abortion side have been matched, especially in recent months, by efforts by abortion-rights supporters to liberalize state abortion laws. To some extent, these laws are meant to prepare for a potential post-Roe future if federal protections on the right to an abortion disappear, abortion-rights supporters want to make sure states protect access.


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Missouris Last Abortion Provider Wins Reprieve As Judge Rules Against State

The poll found that Americans are very much against requiring fines and/or prison time for doctors who perform abortions. There was also slim majority support for allowing abortions at any time during a pregnancy if there is no viability outside the womb and for requiring insurance companies to cover abortion procedures. A slim majority also opposed allowing pharmacists and health providers the ability to opt out of providing medicine or surgical procedures that result in abortion.

At the same time, two-thirds were in favor of a 24-hour waiting period from the time a woman meets with a health care professional until having the abortion procedure itself two-thirds wanted doctors who perform abortions to have hospital admitting privileges and a slim majority wanted the law to require women to be shown an ultrasound image at least 24 hours before an abortion procedure.

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Whats most interesting here, Carvalho said, is that the extremes are really outliers. When they advocate for their positions and change the debate toward the most extreme position on the issue, they actually do the opposite. They move public opinion away from them.


The more vocal advocates on either side, however, have had the ability to shift the debate and public opinion to their point of view. Consider that many of the specific items above, at one point or another, have been hotly debated.

When does life begin?

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Democrats Vs Republicans On Abortion

Many democrats and other pro-abortion groups color republicans as anti-womens-rights, or as being callous on the issues of womens freedoms. This is especially common in cases where republicans are against abortion in cases of rape or birth defect. However, most republicans are not against womens rights, they are simply defending the rights that they believe the unborn child has. They seek to provide women with unwanted pregnancies with whatever support they can, as long as it does not infringe on anothers rights. However, this coloring of pro-life republicans as women haters has definitely affected the partys support from the female demographic. In the latest presidential election, President Obama held an overwhelming majority of womens votes, and many speculate that it was, at least in part, due to the republican views on abortion.

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Opinionrepublicans New Abortion Laws Will Harm Women So Much For Being Pro Life

Over the years, though, Republican doublespeak has lulled too many Americans who otherwise support legal abortion into a sense of complacency. Theyve continued to essentially make abortions more and more difficult to obtain or all but illegal, while telling us what we wanted to hear: Were protecting women!Were giving women more options!Were making abortion safer! All the while, they were methodically laying the groundwork for the moment they could simply make it illegal everywhere, once they had a Supreme Court stacked against abortion and an electorate too inundated with misinformation and riddled with gerrymandering and voter suppression to actively fight back.

Theyve done it under our noses, in front of our faces, for decades. They have been restricting and trying to ban abortion in order to create Supreme Court test cases, rendering Roe v. Wade meaningless for an ever-increasing number of people, all while steadfastly maintaining that they were being reasonable that they were the ones working to improve abortion safety when in reality, they were working to end legal abortion all along. Republicans may have been gaslighting Americans to the point of no return with Roe v. Wade.

And now were all about to see just how much that gaslighting has paid off for them, and how steep the price is that the vast majority of Americans who support the legal right to abortion will have to pay in return.

Two Ways To Read The Story

Kansas Voters Protect Abortion Rights
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Ryan Bombergers life has become a focal point in a dramatic shift in the politics of abortion.

In the recent past, Republicans who opposed abortion generally made exceptions for cases of rape and incest. But for a growing number, a new conviction is taking shape: Unborn lives have value, even when conceived in violence.


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Families Say Athletic Bans Would Exact Toll On Rural Transgender Youth

Lawmakers in more than two dozen states are debating transgender athletic bans.

Oakley said one of the most sweeping laws was in Arkansas, which enacted a statute that prohibits trans youth from accessing surgery or hormonal treatment for gender transition. The bill was vetoed by Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, but the veto was overridden by the GOP-led legislature. A court injunction has prevented the law from taking effect, and the legal wrangling has just begun.

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, at first vetoed a bill that would have banned transgender women and girls from female high school sports. But under pressure from the right, Noem, who may be considering a presidential run, backtracked and issued an executive order to impose the ban.

Its harder to get people swept up in anti-LGBT rhetoric, she said in a phone interview.


Opinion is favoring not only LGBT folks but also trans folks as well. Therefore, she said, the attention has turned to trans kids.

The problem is the rhetoric: Every trans girl who wants to play sports is taking an opportunity away from a cis girl who wants to play sports. Not true, she said.

Religion And The Belief In God Is Vital To A Strong Nation

Republicans are generally accepting only of the Judeo-Christian belief system. For most Republicans, religion is absolutely vital in their political beliefs and the two cannot be separated. Therefore, separation of church and state is not that important to them. In fact, they believe that much of what is wrong has been caused by too much secularism.

Those are the four basic Republican tenets: small government, local control, the power of free markets, and Christian authority. Below are other things they believe that derive from those four ideas.

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Why We Wrote This

Traditionally, Republicans against abortion have supported exceptions for rape and incest. But as Roe v. Wade teeters, a shift is taking shape.

Mr. Bomberger was conceived after his birth mother was raped, and he now runs a faith-based anti-abortion organization in Virginia. Since 2021, at least 12 Republican-controlled states have passed bills that would severely restrict or ban abortion. Only three include exceptions for rape or incest.

To critics, these laws are about fundamentally changing womens rights. They allow the rights of fetuses to trump the rights of living, breathing girls and women, says Kimberly Hamlin, a history professor at Miami University. Women have always understood, whether or not they could say it or not say it, bodily autonomy and political autonomy are two sides of the same coin.

For now, most new Republican state laws still give women 6 to 15 weeks of pregnancy to get an abortion. But that is a political compromise. Florida state Sen. Kelli Stargel, a Republican, says, I believe that life begins at conception, and we have a duty to protect innocent life, even in the most difficult circumstances.

Ryan Bomberger was 13 years old when his adoptive parents first told him he was conceived after his birth mother was raped.


Battleground Republicans Squeezed Hardest On Abortion After Roe Falls

Should rape victims be able to have abortions? Republicans don

Democrats insist the Supreme Court ruling will hurt them in the suburbs. But few of the GOP’s most vulnerable are budging or talking.

GOP Rep. Peter Meijer, whose seat remains a potential pickup for Democrats despite the rough climate, said only no to the codify-Roe question before dashing into the House chamber. | Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

06/26/2022 07:00 AM EDT

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House Republicans say theyre mostly unfazed by the political ramifications of Fridays Supreme Court abortion ruling. Except some of their most endangered incumbents, whod rather not say much about it at all.

Even Republicans from the nations biggest battlegrounds now embrace the anti-abortion mantle, a near-universal position in a House GOP conference veering rightward. But as abortion rights remain highly popular with voters, including in swing districts, most of those vulnerable lawmakers were uninterested in discussing the particulars of what, if anything, should happen following the courts Friday ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade.


Asked Friday outside the Capitol if hed now support that bill to codify Roe, Rep. Steve Chabot , whose district backed Biden by 9 points in 2020, said only: I have a flight right now, before diving into a waiting car. Faced with the same question inside the building, a few swing-seat Republicans rushed into the House chamber rather than answer.

Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

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Views On Abortion By Political Party And Ideology 2022

Conservative Republicans and Republican leaners are far more likely to say abortion should be illegal in all or most cases than to say that it should be legal . Among moderate and liberal Republicans, 60% say abortion should be legal, while 38% say it should be illegal.

The vast majority of liberal Democrats and Democratic leaners support legal abortion , as do seven-in-ten conservative and moderate Democrats .

How Far Does Support For Abortion Go And What Does Support Actually Look Like

As mentioned earlier, there is a gradation of opinion among people who believe that abortion should be legal under most or certain circumstances. In order to understand that variance of opinion, we further explored the aforementioned KFF Abortion Knowledge and Attitudes report, which dove deep into this topic.

The report found that while the majority of people are generally supportive of abortion being legal in some form, most people are fairly comfortable putting some restrictions or limitations on abortion rights and access. For example, 66 percent of those surveyed said they support laws requiring people to wait 24 hours between meeting with a health-care provider and getting an abortion, and 57 percent said they support laws requiring doctors to show and describe ultrasound images to people seeking an abortion. These are examples of laws that are designed to make it harder for people to get abortions, and yet a clear majority of respondents supported these measures.

Anti-abortion rights rhetoric and misinformation has seeped into mainstream understanding of abortion. Miller theorizes that misinformation is able to persist because the stigma surrounding abortion keeps people from talking about it openly.

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No Middle Ground When It Comes To Killing The Unborn

The next thing that conservatives need to accept is there is no middle ground. What is the middle ground between those who think that it is a mother’s right to choose whether to keep or kill anunborn child, and those who think the unborn child was created by God at conception with the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness as protected by the constitution?

Both Sides Still Tried To Appeal To The Center For A While

Indiana lawmakers react to Kansas abortion vote

Even after the parties began to move apart on the issue, activists on both sides tried to appeal to the center, as Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University who studies the history of the abortion debate, wrote recently at the Washington Post. In the 1990s and early 2000s, for instance, many abortion opponents devoted their energy to supporting incremental restrictions, like a ban on dilation and extraction, a technique for abortions later in pregnancy that opponents called partial-birth abortion. The restriction, which was eventually passed at the federal level in 2003, is far less sweeping than the heartbeat bills many Republican lawmakers favor today, which would ban abortions as early as six weeks.

Democrats, meanwhile, could be somewhat equivocal on abortion during this time period, with Bill Clinton during his 1992 campaign famously saying that abortions should be safe, legal, and rare. Hillary Clinton used the same language in her 2008 presidential campaign.

But more recently, both sides of the abortion debate have come to seek broader change. Among abortion-rights supporters, theres been an increasing awareness of reproductive justice.The term, coined in 1994, describes an approach focused not just on the legal right to an abortion, but on safe, affordable access to a range of reproductive health care, as well as the ability to parent children safely.

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Opinionheres How The Supreme Court May All But End Abortion Without Killing Roe V Wade

The impetus was the case , which the Supreme Court agreed in October to hear on the docket in March, it will be the courts first time hearing a case on abortion rights with Justice Brett Kavanaugh on the bench. The case centers on a 2014 Louisiana law that requires abortion providers in the state to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, known in reproductive rights circles as a TRAP law . If the court sides with Louisiana, all but one clinic in the state will be forced to close and many peoples access to abortion services will be eliminated in other states across the country that either have or will pass similar laws.

The Supreme Courts decision to hear the Louisiana law surprised many observers because it is identical to a Texas law that was struck down by the court a mere four years ago. But Republican supporters of the law were using very different language then, both in public statements and before the courts: They framed the admitting privileges provision not as a means of curtailing abortion, but as a means of protecting the health and safety of women. The common-sense measures Texas has put in place elevate the standard of care and protect the health of Texas women, Texas Attorney General Kenneth Paxton said before oral arguments in 2016.

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