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Wednesday, January 26, 2022
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What Is Trumps Approval Rating With Republicans

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More Than Half Of Young Americans Are Going Through An Extended Period Of Feeling Down Depressed Or Hopeless In Recent Weeks; 28% Have Had Thoughts That They Would Be Better Off Dead Or Of Hurting Themself In Some Way

Fifty-one percent of young Americans say that at least several days in the last two weeks they have felt down, depressed, or hopeless–19% say they feel this way more than half of the time. In addition, 68% have little energy, 59% say they have trouble with sleep, 52% find little pleasure in doing things. 49% have a poor appetite or are over-eating, 48% cite trouble concentrating, 32% are moving so slowly, or are fidgety to the point that others notice — and 28% have had thoughts of self-harm

Among those most likely to experience bouts of severe depression triggering thoughts that they would be better off dead or hurting themself are young people of color , whites without a college experience , rural Americans , and young Americans not registered to vote .

In the last two weeks, 53% of college students have said that their mental health has been negatively impacted by school or work-related issues; overall 34% have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus, 29% self-image, 29% personal relationships, 28% social isolation, 25% economic concerns, 22% health concerns–and 21% politics .


A Plurality Believe History Will Judge Trump As A The Worst President Ever; Less Than A Quarter Of Young Americans Want Trump To Play A Key Role In The Future Of Republican Politics; Young Republicans Are Divided

Thirty percent of young Americans believe that history will judge Donald Trump as “the worst president ever.” Overall, 26% give the 45th president positive marks , while 54% give Trump negative marks ; 11% believe he will go down as an average president.

Twenty-two percent of young Americans surveyed agree with the statement, “I want Donald Trump to play a key role in the future of Republican politics,” 58% disagreed, and 19% neither agreed nor disagreed. Among young Republicans, 56% agreed while 22% disagreed, and 21% were neutral. Only 61% of those who voted for Trump in the 2020 general indicated their desire for him to remain active in the GOP.

If they “had to choose,” 42% of young Republicans consider themselves supporters of the Republican party, and not Donald Trump. A quarter indicated they are Trump supporters first, 24% said they support both.


Young Americans Are Significantly More Likely To Be Politically Engaged Than They Were A Decade Ago; A Sharp Increase In Progressive Political Values Marked Since 2016

Less than one year after Barack Obama’s election, 24% of young Americans considered themselves to be politically active . Twelve years later, we find the share of politically active Americans increased by half — and now 36% are politically active. The most politically active among this cohort are young Blacks . 

Over the last five years, on a host of issues ranging from health care, to climate, immigration, poverty, and affirmative action–young Americans are increasingly more likely to favor government intervention. For example, we found:

  • A 19-point increase in agreement with the statement “Qualified minorities should be given special preferences in hiring and education” .
  • An 18-point increase in agreement with the statement “Government should do more to curb climate change, even at the expense of economic growth” .
  • A 16-point increase since 2016 in agreement with “The government should spend more to reduce poverty” .
  • A 16-point increase in “Basic health insurance is a right for all people, and if someone has no means of paying for it, the government should provide it” .
  • An 8-point increase in agreement with “Recent immigration into this country has done more good than harm .

Forty Percent Of Young Americans Expect Their Lives To Be Better As A Result Of The Biden Administration; Many More Feel A Part Of Bidens America Than Trumps


  • Whites: 30% better, 28% worse
  • Blacks: 54% better, 4% worse
  • Hispanics: 51% better, 10% worse

Forty-six percent of young Americans agreed that they “feel included in Biden’s America,” 24% disagreed . With the exception of young people living in rural America, at least a plurality indicated they felt included. This stands in contrast to “Trump’s America.” Forty-eight percent reported that they did not feel included in Trump’s America, while 27% indicated that they felt included . The only major subgroup where a plurality or more felt included in Trump’s America were rural Americans. 

  • 39% of Whites feel included in Biden’s America, 32% do not ; 35% of Whites feel included in Trump’s America, 41% do not .
  • 61% of Blacks feel included in Biden’s America, 13% do not ; 16% of Blacks feel included in Trump’s America, 60% do not .
  • 51% of Hispanics feel included in Biden’s America, 12% do not ; 17% of Hispanics feel included in Trump’s America, 55% do not .

Nearly A Third Of Young Americans Say That Politics Has Gotten In The Way Of A Friendship; Differences Of Opinion On Race

Trump Approval Underwater After GOP

Thirty-one percent of young Americans, but 37% of young Biden voters and 32% of young Trump voters say that politics has gotten in the way of a friendship before. Gender is not a strong predictor of whether or not politics has invaded personal space, but race and ethnicity are. Young whites are more likely than young Blacks to say that politics has gotten in the way–and nearly half of white Biden voters say politics has negatively impacted a friendship; 30% of white Trump voters say the same.

When young Americans were asked whether a difference of opinion on several political issues might impact a friendship, 44% of all young Americans said that they could not be friends with someone who disagreed with them on race relations. Sixty percent of Biden voters agreed with this sentiment, as did a majority of women and Blacks . Americans between 18 and 24 were more likely than those slightly older to feel that race relations would cause a problem with friendships. Differences of opinion on whether or not to support Trump was an issue for slightly more than a third , followed by immigration , police reform , abortion , climate change , and guns .


Despite The State Of Our Politics Hope For America Is Rising And So Is Youths Faith In Their Fellow Americans

In the fall of 2017, only 31% of young Americans said they were hopeful about the future of America; 67% were fearful. Nearly four years later, we find that 56% have hope. While the hopefulness of young whites has increased 11 points, from 35% to 46% — the changes in attitudes among young people of color are striking. Whereas only 18% of young Blacks had hope in 2017, today 72% are hopeful . In 2017, 29% of Hispanics called themselves hopeful, today that number is 69% .

Donald Trump’s Approval Rating Among Republicans Drops To ‘career Low’ Months After ‘career High’: Poll

U.S.Donald TrumpPollRepublicans

President Donald Trump’s approval rating among Republicans has hit a “career low” after sliding 13 percentage points in just three months, according to a new poll.


The commander-in-chief still enjoys the approval of most Republicans, but satisfaction with his performance in office among the GOP dropped from a “career-high” 87 percent in July to 74 percent at the end of October, the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll has found.

The survey conducted by Langer Research Associates between October 27-30 also found that 67 percent of conservatives, a separate group to Republicans, approved of Trump’s performance, a fall from 77 percent in July.

More than a quarter of Republicans and 32 percent of conservatives further said they disapproved of Trump’s handling of impeachment proceedings when they were polled in the run up to the House vote to formalize the inquiry.

Trump’s overall approval numbers were stable, if low, with just 38 percent of the 1,003 adults surveyed saying they approved of the president’s performance.

The survey’s recording of a steep decline in approval of the president within his party differs from other polling numbers.


A Reuters/Ipsos Mori poll released earlier this week put Republican registered voter approval of Trump at 84 percent, while an Economist/YouGov survey conducted between October 27-29 found that 88 percent of the GOP either strongly or somewhat approved of the president.

Trump Approval Remains Stable In New Nbc Poll With Republicans Unmoved After Capitol Violence

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump is the only president in history to be impeached twice — this time for his role in encouraging a deadly assault on the Capitol by his supporters — but he is poised to leave office with a job approval rating that is fairly typical of his entire time in office.

A new NBC News poll found that 43 percent of voters nationwide gave Trump a positive job approval rating, just barely down from 45 percent who said the same before the November election and the 44 percent who approved of his performance shortly after he took office in 2017.


Half Of Republican Respondents Said Former President Should Play Major Role In Partys Future

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Former president Donald Trump’s popularity rating among Republicans has begun to bounce back since he left office, with half of respondents saying they think he should play a “major role” in the GOP’s future.


According to tracking by Morning Consult, 81 per cent of Republican voters polled between 23 to 25 January hold positive views of Mr Trump, including 54 per cent who do so strongly.

The number marks an improvement on the 76 per cent low of Republican voters who favoured him in tracking between 10 and 12 of January ahead of his impeachment when those who strongly favoured Mr Trump sat at 49 per cent.

Fifty percent of Republican voters in a poll by the company between the 22 and 25 of January also think Mr Trump should maintain a significant role in the party’s future, an increase of nine percentage points since the insurrection.

The former president’s popularity dropped following the 6 January when pro-Trump supporters attacked the Capitol as lawmakers gathered to certify Joe Biden’s win, vandalising and looting the building.


% Of Republican Voters Approve Of The Outgoing President Up 3 Points From Last Weeks Nadir

  • 20% of GOP voters disapprove of Trump’s job performance, similar to the share who support a Senate conviction in the upcoming impeachment trial.

  • The bulk of Republican voters disapprove of the way Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has handled impeachment proceedings.

  • Overall, 55% of voters back Trump’s conviction and removal by the Senate, 5 points more than the share who did so ahead of the chamber’s February 2020 vote for his first impeachment trial.

President Donald Trump’s approval rating among Republican voters is back on the uptick after it dropped earlier this month following the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol by a group of Trump supporters, underscoring the political risk facing Senate Republicans who are set to decide the president’s fate in their chamber’s upcoming impeachment trial. 

Morning Consult Political Intelligence tracking conducted Jan. 15-17 found 79 percent of Republican voters approve of the outgoing president, up 3 percentage points from 76 percent in polling conducted Jan. 10-12, before 10 House Republicans joined all Democrats in voting to impeach Trump on a charge of inciting the insurrection that resulted in the deaths of five people, including a Capitol Police officer.

The samples included responses from more than 4,400 Republican voters, with margins of error of 1 point.

Nearly half of Republican voters disapprove of McConnell’s approach to impeachment, while 32 percent approve of how he’s tackled the issue.

% Of Republican Voters Approve Of The Outgoing President Up 3 Points From Last Weeks Nadir

  • 20% of GOP voters disapprove of Trump’s job performance, similar to the share who support a Senate conviction in the upcoming impeachment trial.

  • The bulk of Republican voters disapprove of the way Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has handled impeachment proceedings.

  • Overall, 55% of voters back Trump’s conviction and removal by the Senate, 5 points more than the share who did so ahead of the chamber’s February 2020 vote for his first impeachment trial.

President Donald Trump’s approval rating among Republican voters is back on the uptick after it dropped earlier this month following the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol by a group of Trump supporters, underscoring the political risk facing Senate Republicans who are set to decide the president’s fate in their chamber’s upcoming impeachment trial. 

Morning Consult Political Intelligence tracking conducted Jan. 15-17 found 79 percent of Republican voters approve of the outgoing president, up 3 percentage points from 76 percent in polling conducted Jan. 10-12, before 10 House Republicans joined all Democrats in voting to impeach Trump on a charge of inciting the insurrection that resulted in the deaths of five people, including a Capitol Police officer.

The samples included responses from more than 4,400 Republican voters, with margins of error of 1 point.

Nearly half of Republican voters disapprove of McConnell’s approach to impeachment, while 32 percent approve of how he’s tackled the issue.

Not Only Is Trumps Approval With Republicans Not 96 Percent Energy Appears To Be Slipping

So here’s this again.

That’s from late Tuesday night, but President Trump has made the same claim repeatedly. He said his approval among Republicans was 96 percent on June 8, on June 6, on May 21, on May 12, on May 2, on April 21 and on April 10, which was the first time he claimed his approval was 96 percent. For about a year prior, he had consistently claimed it was 95 percent. Before that, he kept saying it was 94 percent.

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As we’ve repeatedly pointed out, this isn’t how approval ratings work. You don’t earn a new level and stay at that level for months on end. If Trump’s approval rating was at 94 percent over and over in 2018, it would probably have jumped to 96 percent once or twice if only because of margins of error — and he would have tweeted about it.

But it’s also obviously false because there’s no public poll showing anything similar. In fact, despite Trump’s claim that 24 out of 25 Republicans view his job performance with approval, recent polling suggests energy within his party for his performance as president might actually be slipping.

The Economist conducts a national poll each week in partnership with YouGov. Each week, it asks respondents both whether they approve of the job that Trump is doing and whether they view Trump favorably as an individual.

For the most part, those views are static: Fewer than half of Americans view Trump with approval, but most Republicans do. The same pattern holds for favorability.

A Large Share Of Republicans Want Trump To Remain Head Of The Party Cnbc Survey Shows

the weaker party: From 538: Trump’s Approval Rating Is ...

A CNBC survey conducted in the days before former President Donald Trump‘s impeachment trial finds a large share of Republicans want him to remain head of their party, but a majority of Americans want him out of politics.

The CNBC All-America Economic Survey shows 54% of Americans want Trump “to remove himself from politics entirely.” That was the sentiment of 81% of Democrats and 47% of Independents, but only 26% of Republicans.

When it comes to Republicans, 74% want him to stay active in some way, including 48% who want him to remain head of the Republican Party, 11% who want him to start a third party, and 12% who say he should remain active in politics but not as head of any party.

“If we’re talking about Donald Trump’s future, at the moment, the survey shows he still has this strong core support within his own party who really want him to continue to be their leader,” said Jay Campbell, a partner with Hart Research and the Democratic pollster for the survey.

But Micah Roberts, the survey’s Republican pollster, and a partner with Public Opinion Strategies, emphasized the change from when Trump was president. Polls before the election regularly showed Trump with GOP approval ratings around 90%, meaning at least some Republicans have defected from Trump.

Squawk on the Street

Trump’s Approval Rating Holding Steady At 43 Percent With 55 Percent Disapproving

The same poll found that 35 percent of voters — including 74 percent of Republicans but just 30 percent of independents and 3 percent of Democrats — believe President-elect Joe Biden did not win the election legitimately.

Sixty-one percent of all voters — but just 21 percent of Republicans — say Biden did win legitimately.

While a record 10 House Republicans broke ranks to vote for Trump’s impeachment last week, his approval rating among Republicans shows that GOP voters are widely disillusioned with him.

Almost 9 in 10 Republicans — 87 percent — give Trump a thumbs-up, compared with 89 percent who said the same before the November election.

And even for the half of Republicans who say they prioritize the GOP in general over allegiance to Trump, his high approval remains unmoved by recent events.

Among Republicans who say their primary loyalty is to Trump over the party, 98 percent approve of his performance. For those who say they prioritize the party over the president, his approval still stands at 81 percent — virtually unchanged from October.

In the NBC News survey, nearly a third of GOP voters surveyed — 28 percent — said Trump’s words and actions related to the violence at the Capitol reinforced their vote for Trump.

Just 5 percent said they now regretted their support for him, and two-thirds — 66 percent — said their feelings had not changed.

An additional 9 percent say Trump is “not as good as most.”

Trumps Approval Rating Holding Steady At 43 Percent With 55 Percent Disapproving

The same poll found that 35 percent of voters — including 74 percent of Republicans but just 30 percent of independents and 3 percent of Democrats — believe President-elect Joe Biden did not win the election legitimately.

Sixty-one percent of all voters — but just 21 percent of Republicans — say Biden did win legitimately.

While a record 10 House Republicans broke ranks to vote for Trump’s impeachment last week, his approval rating among Republicans shows that GOP voters are widely disillusioned with him.

Almost 9 in 10 Republicans — 87 percent — give Trump a thumbs-up, compared with 89 percent who said the same before the November election.

And even for the half of Republicans who say they prioritize the GOP in general over allegiance to Trump, his high approval remains unmoved by recent events.

Among Republicans who say their primary loyalty is to Trump over the party, 98 percent approve of his performance. For those who say they prioritize the party over the president, his approval still stands at 81 percent — virtually unchanged from October.

In the NBC News survey, nearly a third of GOP voters surveyed — 28 percent — said Trump’s words and actions related to the violence at the Capitol reinforced their vote for Trump.

Just 5 percent said they now regretted their support for him, and two-thirds — 66 percent — said their feelings had not changed.

An additional 9 percent say Trump is “not as good as most.”

A Key Question Moving Forward: Is Trumps Grip On The Gop Stronger Than His Bases

An odd fight broke out earlier this week that may well have escaped your notice. A former senior member of Donald Trump’s administration released the results of polling arguing that the former president’s grip on the Republican base has weakened. Trump and his team pushed back hard, but that was largely ignored because of the release of the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial and Trump’s diminished voice in the public sphere.

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The argument made by a super PAC associated with former national security adviser John Bolton centered on the extent to which Republican voters were still likely to follow Trump’s political lead. The desired outcome here is obvious: Bolton, who became a vocal Trump critic, wants to suggest to Republicans that the political cost of bucking Trump has faded. Ergo, the poll.

It centered on three points: that Trump’s favorability has fallen, that his endorsement isn’t critical and that many Republicans don’t plan to support him in a possible 2024 bid. Each of those arguments, though, isn’t very strong. The favorability drop compares two polls and shows a small shift from “very favorable” views to “somewhat favorable.” The endorsement point leverages a format — would you be more or less likely to vote for a candidate endorsed by Trump, etc. — that is notoriously iffy.

The 2024 polling still shows Trump at 50 percent among Republican voters, 39 points above the second-place contender. Not exactly a weak position in a crowded field.

Joe Biden Approval Rating Down With Democrats But Up 8 Percent With Republicans

PoliticsJoe BidenApproval ratingRepublicansDemocrats

President Joe Biden‘s approval rating among Republicans has increased by eight percent in the last two months even as his overall approval has taken a hit, according to a new poll.

A Monmouth University poll taken between June 9 and 14 shows Biden’s approval rating now stands at 48 percent against 43 percent disapproval – a decline of six points since April.

However, Biden’s approval among Republican voters has risen from 11 percent to 19 percent over the same period, bucking a trend that has seen fewer Democrats and independents saying they approve of the job he’s doing.

Pence ‘Not a Traitor’ Says Kevin McCarthy, ‘Stood Right by President Trump’

The poll released on Friday showed that Biden’s approval among Democrats had fallen to 86 percent from a high of 95 percent in a Monmouth University poll conducted between April 8 and 12.

June’s poll surveyed a national random sample of 810 adults aged 18 and above, while April’s poll surveyed 800 people on the same basis.

Biden’s approval has also fallen among independents and currently stands as 36 percent. This is a significant fall from the 47 percent of independents who expressed a positive view of him in the April poll.

Biden’s overall approval rating stood at 54 percent and disapproval at 41 percent in April. However, the president is currently doing better among Republican voters despite a general decline.

Newsweek has asked Monmouth University for comment.

A Third Of The Gop Is Skeptical Of Trump But Half Of That Group Prefers Trump

President Biden’s approval ratings have been unusually stable for a very simple reason: Democrats like him a lot, and Republicans don’t. That’s a majority of Americans with strong, mostly unmoving opinions, meaning that variations that occur won’t move the top-line number very much. It’s an artifact of the sharp polarization the country has been experiencing for years — and is not something unique to Biden. President Donald Trump saw a similar effect for nearly all of his time in office as did President Barack Obama after an initial honeymoon period.

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One effect of that stability is that we don’t spend very much time talking about Biden’s approval numbers. News organizations tend to focus on what’s new or otherwise notable, and months of slightly-above-50-percent polling ain’t that.

What is unusual, though, are the number of Republicans who, despite their skepticism of Biden, approve of his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. About a third of Republicans think Biden is handling the pandemic well, according to new polling from Quinnipiac University. That’s about four times as many Republicans as approve of Biden’s performance overall or view him favorably. It’s an unusual bit of semi-bipartisanship; getting a third of Republicans to say anything positive about Biden seems remarkable.

Among Republicans, it continues to not be enough for Biden simply to not be Trump.

A Third Of The Gop Is Skeptical Of Trump But Half Of That Group Prefers Trump

President Biden’s approval ratings have been unusually stable for a very simple reason: Democrats like him a lot, and Republicans don’t. That’s a majority of Americans with strong, mostly unmoving opinions, meaning that variations that occur won’t move the top-line number very much. It’s an artifact of the sharp polarization the country has been experiencing for years — and is not something unique to Biden. President Donald Trump saw a similar effect for nearly all of his time in office as did President Barack Obama after an initial honeymoon period.

arrow-right

One effect of that stability is that we don’t spend very much time talking about Biden’s approval numbers. News organizations tend to focus on what’s new or otherwise notable, and months of slightly-above-50-percent polling ain’t that.

What is unusual, though, are the number of Republicans who, despite their skepticism of Biden, approve of his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. About a third of Republicans think Biden is handling the pandemic well, according to new polling from Quinnipiac University. That’s about four times as many Republicans as approve of Biden’s performance overall or view him favorably. It’s an unusual bit of semi-bipartisanship; getting a third of Republicans to say anything positive about Biden seems remarkable.

Among Republicans, it continues to not be enough for Biden simply to not be Trump.

A Popular Theory For Trumps Popularity Among Republicans Appears To Be Wrong

It is not the case, despite President Trump’s regular assertions, that his approval rating among Republicans is a consistent 95 percent. Although that figure appears regularly in the president’s Twitter feed, there appears to be no basis for it in public polling.

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It is, however, the case that Trump is broadly popular among Republicans. In YouGov’s most recent poll with the Economist, 88 percent of his party approves of the job he’s doing — somewhat offsetting the disapproval he garners among 89 percent of Democrats.

To Democrats, the level of support for Trump within his party seems occasionally baffling. How could someone they hate so much be viewed so positively by the other party? Over the course of Trump’s presidency, a theory emerged: He’s so popular among Republicans because Trump-skeptical Republicans have simply given up on the party. Wring all the skeptics out of the party, and you’re left with a more unanimous, if smaller, core.

There’s a public example of how this would work, after all: Had Rep. Justin Amash not left the party in July, the vote to impeach Trump in the House would not have been unanimously opposed by Republicans. Instead of Republicans voting 195-to-1 against impeachment, it was 195-to-0. This, perhaps, is how Trump’s approval also works.

Unfortunately for that theory, though, the numbers don’t really back it up.

The numbers haven’t changed much.

Fact Check: Trump Makes 3 False Claims In 19 Words About His Approval Rating

A Correction: Here’s How Trump Is Doing Among Republican ...

President Donald Trump made three false claims on Saturday in a single 19-word tweet.

The tweet: “94% Approval Rating in the Republican Party, an all time high. Ronald Reagan was 87%. Thank you!”

Facts First: Trump does not have a 94% approval rating among Republicans; he is at 90% in Gallup polling. Trump has not recorded the all-time high for Republican approval; his peak ranks sixth out of the seven Republican presidents after World War II. And Reagan’s peak was 94%, not 87%.

Trump has been falsely claiming for more than a year to have set the all-time high for approval among Republican voters – first at “over 90%,” then at “93%,” and now, as of June, at “94%.” He has even claimed to have beaten Abraham Lincoln, though there was no scientific polling on approval ratings in the 1800s.

In reality, he has never come close to setting the record.

Let’s break down the three ways his latest tweet was incorrect.

1) Trump does not have a 94% approval rating among Republicans.

Trump is extremely popular with Republicans, but we could not find a single recent poll where his approval rating with party supporters was 94% or higher.

We asked the White House late Sunday night to tell us what poll had Trump at 94% with Republicans. We had not received a response as of 1 p.m. on Monday.

2) Trump has not recorded the all-time high for Republican approval.

That “about a week” was also incorrect: Bush stayed at 97% or higher with Republicans for more than five months, until March 2002.

Arizona Election Official Reacts To ‘check Your Six’ Threat From Republican

President Donald Trump will leave office with the lowest approval rating of his presidency, according to a new CNN Poll conducted by SSRS, with more Americans than ever in support of removing him from office.

sworn in this week

January 6 attack on the US CapitolCNN Poll: Republican Party favorability dips as most want party to move on from Trump

Even If It Were True 94 Percent Republican Approval Would Not Be A Record

It’s not the case that Trump’s approval rating among Republicans is 94 percent, but even if it were, it wouldn’t be the “record” he claims.

As Politifact detailed in June, when Trump claimed during a news conference with then-British Prime Minister Theresa May that “I have a 90 to 94 percent approval rating, as of this morning, in the Republican Party … an all-time record,” he was discounting George W. Bush’s GOP approval rating in the immediate aftermath of 9/11, which hit 99 percent. In fact, Trump’s Republican approval rating during his first 30 months in office lagged behind not just George W. Bush, but George H.W. Bush as well.

So Trump’s claim is a lie about a lie. But that sort of thing is par for the course for him.


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